How to Repair Rips Using CUETools

Dieses Thema im Forum "Exact Audio Copy - English" wurde erstellt von Grayson Lee, 30 Januar 2012.

  1. Grayson Lee

    Grayson Lee
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Registriert seit:
    28 Dezember 2011
    Beiträge:
    2
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    Hello:

    I just ripped an album, Classic Queen. EAC reports that there were erros in the rip and that I can use CUETools to repair this rip.

    How do I go about repairing the rip using CUETools? I am attaching the log file from the rip.

    I have already downloaded CUETools 2.1.2a.

    Thanks,

    Grayson
     
  2. Surfy

    Surfy
    Expand Collapse
    Member Deluxe

    Registriert seit:
    31 August 2007
    Beiträge:
    1.057
    Zustimmungen:
    14
    ::

    You should ask here, please.


    Regards, ...

    ::
     
  3. Workie

    Workie
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Registriert seit:
    6 Januar 2009
    Beiträge:
    245
    Zustimmungen:
    5
    Heh. He's probably still reading that 1700+ post thread, or maybe the 150+ post CTDB thread. I'll attempt a brief HOWTO:

    CUETools is a multi-purpose utility for verifying a rip against online databases, or for transforming a .cue file, a full-CD rip, or both. The relatively new repair feature is a transformation of an error-containing rip into a hopefully error-free one, using a correction file from CTDB.

    1. CUETools doesn't strictly require a cue sheet to do certain actions, but it does help simplify usage of the program, because you can point to it as a handle to the entire rip (which may consist of many audio files). So if your rip doesn't have a cue sheet, put the CD back in your drive, and in EAC, go to Action > Create CUE Sheet, and pick the sub-option that matches the kind of rip you made ("Single WAV file" or "Multiple WAV files"), and don't worry about whether your rip was actually compressed when making that choice (the generated .cue will refer to .wav files but CUETools can handle it even if the files are .flac or whatever).
    2. If you haven't done so already, visit the CUETools wiki. Download and unpack the software in a convenient location (there's no installer).
    3. Run CUETools.exe. Observe in the main window: "CUE Paths" is for input and output locations (and a template for automatically generating the output location). "Action" is the choice of what you want to do, further refined by the drop-down selector. "Mode" is the options relating to the currently chosen action. "Audio output" is further options for the Encode action. "Extra" is options for making changes to a rip (like if it was ripped with the wrong offset). The "Go" button performs the action. The upper left corner allows combinations of settings to be loaded and saved as "profiles". The upper right corner has buttons to enable a log panel, open a program settings window, launch a browser to go to the CUETools website, and view the program info. Next to the Input folder icon under CUE Paths is a little downward-pointing triangle which allows you to hide or open one of three kinds of left-side panes for auto-filling the input path (I use the folder browser or drag-n-drop).
    4. Make the input path point to the .cue of the bad rip. Use the default output path, or at least make sure it points to someplace that's not the same folder as the bad rip.
    5. Action = Encode, with "repair" chosen from the drop-down. Mode = The type of rip to create, probably the same type as the bad one, unless you really want it to be different. Audio Output = Lossless, and choose the encoding as you wish.
    6. Click the Go button. If it works, then in the output folder there will be a new version of your rip, error-free.
     
  4. Workie

    Workie
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Registriert seit:
    6 Januar 2009
    Beiträge:
    245
    Zustimmungen:
    5
    AccurateRip: If you are happy with the sound of your rips, then you needn't worry about whether they match other people's. You may feel otherwise if...
    • you are sharing your rips with people who expect perfection
    • you are worried that audible errors might be slipping through (maybe you don't listen to every rip you make right away)
    • you are just a very particular person who can't stomach the idea that even inaudible errors might exist.
    Given a clean CD, most of the time, any ripper & drive can do a simple "burst" rip in one pass, with no checking for errors, and the resulting rip will either have no errors, or only minor, inaudible ones. A dirty/scratched CD is more likely to have errors, including audible ones.

    10+ years ago, it was more likely that a slow computer could be overwhelmed when ripping, especially if you tried to do anything else at the same time; you could get errors in that situation. Back then, drives were also more likely to do weird things with caching and seeking, which could lead to errors, and is the reason why EAC has features to work around these quirks. It's not so much a problem today. Modern computers won't ever be too busy to rip, drives don't cache when ripping audio, and they all have 'Accurate Stream' technology so they seek to where they're supposed to.

    However, that doesn't mean modern drives are guaranteed to be good at ripping. A worn-out drive will have a higher error rate, as will poorly made drives. I have a blazing fast new computer, and yet its DVD/CD drive is for some reason incapable of doing error-free burst rips even on clean CDs. The errors are even audible! So I really have to use programs like EAC, CUERipper, or dbPowerAmp to do "secure" rips, which involves multiple passes and checking for errors. I am satisified with the secure rips, so I don't really need to test for AccurateRip matches, but I do so anyway, just for reassurance.


    Since the errors in your rips are inaudible, it's likely they're infrequent enough that a repair with CUETools is possible. No, you don't need the original CD to do the repair. All that is needed is for at least two people to have ripped the CD without error (as determined by an AccurateRip check at rip time) and for one of them to have uploaded the disc's error correction data to CTDB (which happens automatically in CUERipper and in EAC with the CTDB plugin). CUETools will tell you if the repair is possible when you attempt it.


    I wouldn't worry about deterioration of data sitting on a drive, regardless of the type of drive. Drives nowadays (when in use) detect problems and move data around to avoid physically damaged areas. The entire drive is more likely to fail before random changes occur in the data, in my experience. Any data errors you encounter are more likely to have always been there. I can't say the same for removable media. CD-Rs that I burned 10-12 years ago are starting to have occasional data errors...although I can't say with 100% certainty that the burns were correct at the time I made them.
     
Die Seite wird geladen...

Diese Seite empfehlen